Contact Picture

Pressure Cooking Times

1. Pulses and Legumes

2. Rice

3. Meat and Poultry

4. Seafood

5. Vegetables

6. Fruit

 

 

1.Pulses and Legumes

Dried beans, peas and lentils are generally categorised as pulses and legumes, all of which need to be cooked for a fairly long time – except when they are cooked in a pressure cooker. To tenderise and hydrate them the larger beans and peas need soaking ( see chart below), which also removes dirt and natural toxins. Always discard the soaking water, whichever way you choose to cook them.

Fast soaking methods include bringing the beans in water up to the boil and then discarding the liquid, or pouring boiling water over them and leaving to soak for 3–4 hours. My preferred method is to slowly soak them in cold water for 6–8 hours (or overnight) as this always results in a better texture and more even cooking.

Pulses and legumes double or triple in size after soaking and cooking so do make sure you’ve left enough space in the pressure cooker. Because the resulting volume isn’t exact soak a little extra and any excess can be frozen after cooking. These are useful to have on hand to add to soups and casseroles.

To every cup of soaked or unsoaked pulses or legumes add 3 cups of water for cooking. Adding 1 tablespoon of oil to the cooking water reduces the foaming, which can occasionally block the valves on some cookers.

Cook according to the times on the chart below and use the natural release method to help the beans keep their shape and reduce splitting.

A range of cooking times is given because cooking times vary due to freshness, size variation and soaking methods used. If you are unsure, cook for the lesser time and if not cooked enough finish cooking with the lid off, adding more water if required.

 

Cooking Times for Pulses and Legumes

 

 

Presoaking required

Pressure setting

Time

Yellow or green split peas

No

High

10–12 minutes

Brown lentils

No

High

12–15 minutes

Green, puy, beluga or red lentils

No

High

8–10 minutes

Cannellini beans

Yes

High

10–12 minutes

Chick peas (garbanzo beans)

Yes

High

10–12 minutes

Pink beans

Yes

High

10–12 minutes

Soy beans

Yes

High

15–20 minutes

Haricot beans

Yes

High

12–15 minutes

Black-eyed peas

Yes

High

10–12 minutes

Red kidney beans, medium

Yes

High

10–12 minutes

Lima beans, large

Yes

High

15–20minutes

Back to Top

 

2.Rice

The pressure cooker makes delicious rice quick and easy. Just remember that rice grains double in size so don’t fill the pressure cooker more than half-full.

Add a generous pinch of salt to the cooking water if desired and consider adding extra flavour by using stock instead of water. Or add a sprinkle of herbs and/or spices, eg cumin seeds, tumeric, cardamom pods or a bay leaf.

Always use the natural release method to allow it to continue cooking and absorbing the liquid.

Use the cooking chart below as a guide for times and liquid measurements, but be aware that the freshness of the rice can alter cooking times. If the rice is not cooked enough, finish cooking with the lid off adding more water if required.

 

Rice Cooking Times

 

For 1 cup of rice

Water quantity

Pressure setting

Cooking time

Basmati, jasmine or white rice

1 1/2 cups

High

5–7 minutes

Brown rice

1 1/2 cups

High

15–18 minutes

Aborio or carnaroli Rice

2 1/2–3 cups

High

5–7 minutes

Back to Top

 

3.Meat & Poultry Cooking Times

Cooking meats especially cheaper cuts tend to dry out with other cooking methods or take a long time to cook. These meats are perfect for the pressure cooker.

Browning meat well gives a good flavour and the steam from water or stock keeps the meat moist.

Cook at high pressure and use the natural release method giving the meat time to rest.

To roast meat, any size piece of meat can be cooked in a pressure cooker as long as it fits easily inside the pressure cooker. Allow approximately 15 minutes per 500g of meat and about 2 cups liquid.

To be sure meat is cooked test before removing from pan. Use a meat thermometerand go by the temperature given or insert a small sharp knife into the thickest part of the meat and when removed if the juices run clear the roast is cooked.

To make a gravy from the juices, remove meat from pan and cover with foil and leave to rest while making the gravy. Mix the cornflour with a little cold water to make a paste. Heat the cooking liquid over a medium heat and add cornflour paste while stirring to prevent lumps. Cook for 2 -3 minutes.

 

Meat

Brown

Liquid

Cooking Time

Beef Corned 1 - 1.5 kg

NO

Cover with liquid

30-45 minutes

Beef stew or casserole, cubed

YES

500ml

30-35 minutes

Beef mince

YES

125ml

6 minutes

Beef roast, rolled

YES

500ml

10 -15 minutes per 500g

Chicken boneless, cut into strips or cubed

YES

125ml

3-4 minutes

Chicken breast with bone

YES

125ml

10 minutes

Chicken breast, whole boneless

YES

125ml

8 minutes

Chicken whole

YES

250ml

7-10 minutes per 500g

Chicken mince

YES

125ml

4 minutes

Chicken drumsticks or thighs with bone

YES

125ml

7-10 minutes

Chicken drumsticks or thighs, boneless

YES

125ml

6-8 minutes

Lamb chops, less than 2.5cm thick

YES

125ml

5 minutes

Lamb chops, more then 2.5cm thick

YES

125ml

10 minutes

Lamb roast

YES

500ml

20 minutes

Lamb shanks

YES

250ml

10-15 minutes per 500g

Lamb stew or casserole, diced

YES

500ml

30-35 minutes

Lamb mince

YES

125ml

5 minutes

Pickled Pork 1- 1.5kg

NO

Cover with water

30-45 minutes

Pork chops or steak, 2.5cm thick

YES

125ml

10 minutes

Pork chops or steak, less then 2.5cm thick

YES

125ml

5 minutes

Pork Roast

YES

500ml

10-15 minutes per 500g

Pork stew or casserole, cubed

YES

500ml

30-35 minutes

Venison steaks or chops, more than 2.5cm thick

YES

125ml

10-15 minutes

Venison steaks or chops less than 2.5cm thick

YES

125ml

5-7 minutes

Venison mince

YES

125ml

10 minutes

       

Back to Top

 

4.Seafood Cooking times

Cooking seafood in a pressure cooker gently steams the seafood, keeping it healthy and moist. It also reduces the cooking odour in the house, just remember to use the quick release method under a range hood so all the fishy smells go straight outside.

Seafood is delicate so always cook on Low pressure. Grease with vegetable oil or line a steamer basket with baking paper and sit fish fillets on this.

Mussels can be placed directly in a ½ cup of water or white wine.

 

Seafood

Liquid

Time on Low Pressure

Salmon fillets or steaks, thick

250ml

8-10 minutes

White fish fillets

125ml

2-3 minutes

Mussels

125 ml

2-3 minutes

Fish, whole, gutted

250ml

5-6 minutes

Back to Top

 

5.Vegetable Cooking Times

 

Vegetable

Liquid

Pressure Setting

Cooking Time

Release Method

Artichokes,trimmed

125ml

High

4 to 12 minutes, depending on size

Quick Release

Artichokes, hearts

125ml

Low

3-4 minutes

Quick Release

Asparagus, whole

125ml

Low

1 to 2 minutes

Quick Release

Beans, green, fresh

125ml

Low

3 to 4 minutes

Quick Release

Beetroot/ Red beet, whole

250ml

High

12-20 minutes depending on size

Natural Release

Broccoli, florets

125ml

Low

3 to 4 minutes

Quick Release

Brussel Sprouts

125ml

Low

3-5 minutes

Quick Release

Cabbage, shredded

125ml

Low

3 to 4 minutes

Quick Release

Cabbage, quartered

125ml

Low

4 to 6 minutes

Quick Release

Carrots, whole

125ml

High

3 to 5 minutes

Quick Release

Carrots, sliced or cubed

125ml

High

2-4 minutes

Quick Release

Cauliflower, florets

125ml

Low

3 to 4 minutes

Quick Release

Celery, sliced

125ml

Low

4 minutes

Quick Release

Corn, kernels

125ml

Low

1 minute

Quick Release

Corn on the cob

125ml

High

4-6 minutes

Quick Release

Eggplant / Aubergine, sliced or cubed

125ml

Low

3 to 5 minutes

Quick Release

Frozen vegetables, small diced

125ml

Low

2-3 minutes

Quick Release

Kumara/ Sweet potato, 5cm cubes

125ml

High

4 to 5 minutes

Natural Release

Kale & Endive, thickly cut

125ml

Low

5-6 minutes

Quick Release

Leeks, sliced or whole

125ml

High

2 to 4 minutes

Quick Release

Onions, whole

125ml

High

7 to 9 minutes

Quick Release

Parsnips, sliced or cubed

125ml

High

2-5 minutes

Quick Release

Peas, shelled

125ml

Low

1 minute

Quick Release

Peppers/ Capsicums and mild chillies

125ml

Low

3-5 minutes depending on size

Quick Release

Potatoes, new , less than 5cm diameter

125ml

High

8-10 minutes

Natural Release

Potatoes, small dice

125ml

High

4-6 minutes

Natural Release

Potatoes, quartered

125ml

High

8-10 minutes

Natural Release

Potatoes, large, whole

250ml

High

20-25 minutes

Natural Release

Pumpkin, small dice

125ml

High

3- 4 minutes

Quick Release

Pumpkin, large chunks

250ml

High

8-10 minutes

Quick Release

Silverbeet / Swiss Chard, roughly chopped

125ml

Low

2-3 minutes

Quick Release

Spinach, roughly chopped or whole leaves

125ml

Low

1 minute

Quick Release

Tomatoes, medium whole

125ml

High

2-3 minutes

Quick Release

Turnips or swede, cubed

125ml

High

5-8 minutes

Natural Release

Yams New Zealand /Oca, red waxy

125ml

High

5-10 minutes depending on size

Natural Release

Zucchini, Courgette, Summer Squash, sliced

125ml

Low

3-4 minutes

Quick Release

         

Back to Top

 

6.Fruit

Fresh and dried fruit are easily cooked in the pressure cooker.

For fresh fruit. Wash, peel and core fruit. Slice to the desired size.

Fruit can be cooked in the steamer basket sitting on a trivet if wished. Add a minimum of ½ cup water or fruit juice for sliced fruit and 1 cup of liquid for whole fruit.

Sugar and any flavourings, eg spices such as cinnamon, vanilla beans can be added either before or after cooking.

To keep fruit whole use the quick release method if you are intending to pulp of puree the fruit use the natural release method.

Cooking times will vary according to size and ripeness of fruit.

To cook dried fruit use 1 cup of water or fruit juice to every cup of dried fruit. Use either release method when time is up. If fruit is still hard simmer with the lid off for a further few minutes adding more water if required.

 

Fruit

Pressure Setting

Cooking Time

Release Method

Apples, slices and quartered

Low

2-5 minutes depending on size

See notes above

Apricots, halved

Low

4-5 minutes

Quick Release

Berries

Low

3-5 minutes

Quick release

Dried Fruit

High

4-6 minutes

Either method

Feijoas

Low

3-5 minutes 

Quick release

Figs, quartered

Low

3-5 minutes

Quick release

Nashi, sliced

Low

3-5 minutes

Quick release

Peaches, sliced

Low

3-5 minutes

Quick release

Pears , medium whole

Low

10-15 minutes

Quick release

Pears, slices or quartered

Low

2-5 minutes depending on size

Quick release

 

  Back to Top